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Wildside Holidays – Spain

Take a trip on the Wildside! Discover the wildlife and nature of Spain, its Natural and National Parks and find the top wildlife, activity and walking holiday companies.

Looking for Wildlife & Walking Holidays in Spain?

Looking for Wildlife & Walking Holidays in Spain? Wildside Holidays publishes information pages about the Natural and National parks in Spain. Information about wildlife in Spain and where to find it. Just look in the right hand column for the Spanish regions or the top menu for the wildlife pages.

Sustainable rural and wildlife tourism in Spain is a major key to wildlife and habitat protection. There are many studies showing how wildlife tourism can impact local economies, habitats and the wildlife it contains in a very positive way.

In the left column you will find links to some of the top INDEPENDENT activity holiday companies in Spain.

If you are travelling without a walking or wildlife guiding company in Spain then we highly reccommend booking.com for your hotel and accommodation needs.

You can also reserve trains and buses using the booking box of OMIO located in the right hand column of all pages.

A huge thank you to everyone that uses the links on these pages to reserve a hotel or transport in Spain. The small commission we receive helps a lot. Thankyou!

Looking for Wildlife & Walking Holidays in Spain? Wildside Holidays is the answer!

Rio Eo, Oscos y Terras de Burón biosphere reserve

  • Region: Asturias and Galicia (Lugo)
  • Declared a biosphere reserve: 2003
  • Surface area: Almost 160,000 hectares
  • Towns and villages: Ribadeo, Castropol, Trabada, Vegadeo, A Pontenova, San Tirso de Abres, Ribeira de Piquín, Taramundi, A Fonsagrada, Villanueva de Oscos, Baleira, San Martín de Oscos, Negueira de Muñíz, Santa Eulalia de Oscos.

Points of interest

The Río Eo, Oscos y Terras de Burón Biosphere Reserve is basically a land of fusion, a union of Asturian and Galician cultures and a water frontier where diverse forms of life coexist from the sea to the mountains. A landscape that allows you to descend from the silence of the mountains and valleys of the highlands to the light of the sea in just half an hour.

The area includes the entire basin of the Eo river from its source in Fonteo to its mouth in the nature reserve of the Ría de Ribadeo estuary and also the special protection areas for birds (ZEPA) Peñarronda-Barayo, the Ría de Ribadeo Ramsar Wetland and the Penarronda beach natural monument.

Find a hotel in the Rio Eo, Oscos y Terras de Burón biosphere reserve

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Within the territory included in the reserve, four large landscape units can be recognized: the Western Cantabrian coast, the river channels, the estuary and the mountainous terrain. All of these areas are ideal for wildlife watching and the river estuary also an important are for migrant birdlife.

  • The Western Cantabrian Coast is a territory dominated by marine and coastal ecosystems that includes the coastal plain. This is one of the best preserved estuaries in Asturias, the Ría del Eo. Its main interest, in addition to its avifauna, lies in its marsh vegetation, adapted to life in the harsh conditions of the estuary, with periodic floods and a habitat with a very high salt content.
  • Inland, the river channels appear, where the Eo River constitutes the main river system of the Biosphere Reserve. They are valleys with fertile lands used since ancient times for agricultural, livestock and forestry use, as well as for the settlement of towns and villages.
  • The river Eo forms an estuary of great natural value. At its mouth, where the marsh systems and sandy plains are temporarily covered by the action of the tides this area can only be described as stunning.
  • The ranges and mountains leading up to the source of the river Eo progressively acquire a higher altitude as they move away from the coast and approach the Cantabrian mountains. They are covered by forests of oak, chestnut, birch and pine, heathlands and also numerous peat bogs.

The extensive forested area in the mountainous area of ​​the reserve is also home to a large range of species. Among the mammals, the wolf or the sporadic presence of the brown bear stands out. It also houses an important variety of forest birds, with species such as the black woodpecker.

Routes of the Camino de Santiago

There are two routes of the Camino de Santiago that pass through the Rio Eo, Oscos and Terras de Burón biosphere reserve: the Ruta de la Costa and the Camino Primitivo.

Information / visitor centres

Centro de Interpretación de la Ría del Eo – (Castropol).

The Interpretation Center of the Rio Eo, Oscos and Terras de Burón biosphere reserve is easy to find and located in the old factory of “Serrasa” in the town of Castropol. There are audiovisual exhibitions and information panels covering the fauna and flora of the area along with thematic exhibitions about human activity from past to present day.

Scattered across the area are many ethnographic museums, galleries and other sites of interest (Town location in brackets)
  • Conjunto Etnográfico de Os Teixóis y Museo de los Molinos de Mazonovo (Taramundi).
  • Museo Etnográfico de Esquíos (Taramundi).
  • Conjunto Etnográfico de Mazonovo (Santa Eulalia de Oscos).
  • Casa Natal del Marqués de Sargadelos (Santa Eulalia de Oscos).
  • Ecomuseo del Pan (Villanueva de Oscos).
  • Monasterio de Santa María de Villanueva (Villanueva de Oscos).

The official website for the Rio Eo, Oscos y Terras de Burón biosphere reserve is here: https://www.turismoasturias.es/en/descubre/naturaleza/reservas-de-la-biosfera/oscos-eo


Wildside Holidays – Spain

Take a trip on the Wildside! Discover the wildlife and nature of Spain, its Natural and National Parks and find the top wildlife, activity and walking holiday companies.

Valle de Laciana biosphere reserve

  • Region: Castilla y Leon
  • Declared a biosphere reserve: 2003
  • Surface area: almost 23,000 hectares
  • Towns and villages: Villablino, Caboalles de Abajo, Villaseca, Caboalles de Arriba, Villager, Rioscuro, Sosas de Laciana, Robles de Laciana, Rabanal de Abajo, Rabanal de Arriba, Llamas, Orallo, Lumajo, El Villar de Santiago, Caboalles de Abajo, Villaseca de Laciana, Caboalles de Arriba, Rioscuro, Villager de Laciana.

Points of interest

The Valle de Laciana biosphere reserve is a very mountainous area, with altitudes ranging between 950 and 2188 m located in the northwest of the province of León, in the middle of the Cantabrian Mountains. It limits to the west and north with the Muniellos and Somiedo Biosphere Reserves (Asturias), to the east and south with those of Babia and Valle de Omaña y Luna (León) and to the southwest with Palacios del Sil (León). It is a geographically well-defined valley, traversed by the Sil River and small tributaries that divide the territory.

Although climatically it is within the Eurosiberian zone, it has a certain Mediterranean influence and the area contains mixed forests made up of oak (Quercus pirenaica and Quercus petraea), birch (Betula pendula), ash (Fraxinus angustifolia), elm (Ulmus glabra) and juniper. The iconic animal species are the endangered (almost extinct read more here) Western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) and the Cantabrian brown bear (Ursus arctos).

The evolution of the human population of the reserve has been highly dependent on its main economic activity during the last 90 years: coal mining. Until 1910, the Valley had less than 3,000 inhabitants, distributed among the 15 towns of the municipality and who lived from livestock and subsistence agriculture. Around the 20s of the last century, mining activities began on a larger scale with the construction of the railway that connects Villablino with Ponferrada, allowing the extraction of the mineral at a lower cost. Mining attracted a large working population, initially from nearby areas and later from other areas of the country and abroad. In recent times mining has ceased activities in the area due to pressure from various ecologist groups and the European member of parliament David Hammerstein.

Find a hotel close to the Valle de Laciana biosphere reserve

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Cantabrian brown bear

The presence of the Cantabrian brown bear (Ursus arctos) in the area stands out. A species in danger of extinction and whose reproduction in the region has been frequently detected in recent decades, so the territory of the Laciana Valley biosphere reserve It is key in the conservation of the species at the national level.

More in depth information can be found at the dedicated information page for the Cantabrian brown bear here at Wildside Holidays: https://wildsideholidays.co.uk/cantabrian-brown-bear-ursus-arctos-oso-pardo-cantabrico/

Leitariegos ski station

The Leitariegos Ski Resort is located 15 km from the town of Villablino, on the base of Cueto Arbás, the first peak that exceeds 2,000 meters of altitude in the Cantabrian mountains (from the West). The station’s maximum elevation is 1,830 meters, while the minimum elevation is 1,513 meters. The station has 10 slopes (5 red, 4 blue and 1 green) and 6 lifts (2 three-seater chairlifts, 1 two-seater chairlift, 1 ski lift and 1 telebaby), with a capacity of 5,160 passengers / hour.

Access to Leitariegos Station is from Caboalles de Abajo, continuing towards Cangas del Narcea. It can also be accessed from the Asturian side of the mountains. The website is only in Spanish: https://www.leitariegos.net/

Information / visitor centres

Centro de Interpretación del Espacio Natural Alto Sil (Centro del Urogallo)

This is the main information and interpretation centre for the Valle de Laciana biosphere reserve and is an obligatory visit if you want to find out about the fauna and flora of the area. It contains various audio visual displays and exhibitions detailing local wildlife with special emphasis on the Cantabrian brown bear and the Cantabrian grouse (Urogallo in Spanish). Information about the geology and history of the area is also available.

The Casa del Parque del Espacio Natural Ancares-Alto Sil is located in the town of Caboalles de Arriba near Villablino. The best way to get there is by taking the CL-626 at the Barrios de Luna reservoir, leaving the A-66, towards Villablino (about 7 km). It can also be accessed from Ponferrada on the the CL-631 and from León by the CL-626 to La Magdalena then the LE-493 towards Villablino.

Museo Etnográfico “Sierra Pambley”

Located on Avenida la Brañina, 13 in the town of Villablino, this ethnografic museum showcases a traditional wealthy (almost aristocratic) household of the area. An interesting look back in time as to how the richer families lived back in the days of the coal mines. The website (in Spanish) is here: https://www.sierrapambley.org/museo

The official website (in Spanish) for the Valle de Laciana biosphere reserve is: http://lacianareservadelabiosfera.com/


Iberia Nature Forum

Struggling with identifying those bugs and beasties? Why not check out the Iberia nature Forum!

Discover the Iberia Nature Forum – Environment, geography, nature, landscape, climate, culture, history, rural tourism and travel.

Valles de Leza – Jubera – Cidacos and Alhama Biosphere Reserve

  • Region: La Rioja
  • Declared a biosphere: 2003
  • Surface area: Almost 123,000 hectares
  • ZEPA (Special zones for bird protection): Peñas del Iregua, Jubera y Leza, Peñas de Arnedillo, Peña Isasa, Peñalmonte, Sierra de Alcarama and Valle del Alhama.
  • Towns and villages: Aguilar del Río Alhama, Ajamil de Cameros, Arnedillo, Alfaro, Arnedo, Autol, Bergasa, Bergasillas Bajera, Clavijo, Cabezón de Cameros, Cervera del Río Alhama, Cornago, Enciso, Grávalos, Hornillos de Cameros, Igea, Jalón de Cameros, Laguna de Cameros, Leza de Río Leza, Munilla, Muro en Cameros, Muro de Aguas, Navajún, Préjano, Rabanera, Robres del Castillo, San Román de Cameros, Soto en Cameros, Terroba, Torre en Cameros, Valdemadera, Villarroya, Zarzosa, Herce, Lagunilla del Jubera, Ocón, Quel, Ribafrecha, Santa Eulalia Bajera and Santa Engracia del Jubera.

Points of interest

The Valles de Leza – Jubera – Cidacos and Alhama Biosphere Reserve is located in the south eastern part of La Rioja. A mountainous area, the highest peaks reach around 1,600 meters.

The main forest species in this area is holm aak, which can be found in well conserved forests and is mixed with a diverse Mediterranean scrubland. Also present are some beech groves with the most famous being the Santiago forest. The mountainous terrain and river canyons create an ideal habitat for Bonelli’s eagle, griffon vulture, Egyptian vulture, eurasian eagle owl, peregrine falcon and this area also is home to species such as wild cat and otter. There are also large populations of roe deer, red deer and wild boar.

There are around 180 paleontological sites in the area and in some places, well preserved dinosaur tracks.

Find a hotel in the area of Valles de Leza – Jubera – Cidacas and Alhama

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Star Parks – Astronomy and Skywatching

Quite a recent developement, in Spain, a Star Park is a territory that protects its night sky enough to develop observation, educational, cultural or recreational activities, linked to astronomical events (passage of comets, eclipses of the moon and sun, alignment of planets, meteor showers, etc.

Star and sky watching in the Valles de Leza - Jubera - Cidacos and Alhama Biosphere Reserve
Star and sky watching in the Valles de Leza – Jubera – Cidacos and Alhama Biosphere Reserve

Long distance trail GR-93 Sierras de La Rioja

A good way to get to explore this area is to walk some of the different stages of the GR-93 that cross the Camero Viejo (Leza), the Alto Cidacos and the Alhama-Linares valleys.

  • Stage 5 – Ortigosa – Laguna de Cameros
  • Stage 6- Laguna de Cameros – San Román
  • Stage 7 – San Román de Cameros-Munilla
  • Stage 8 – Munilla-Enciso
  • Stage 9 – Enciso-Cornago
  • Stage 10 – Cornago-Cervera del Río Alhama
  • Stage 11 – Cervera del Río Alhama-Valverde

Find maps and information about this at the wikiloc website: https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/gr-93-sierras-de-la-rioja-3231895

Thermal springs

The origins of the use of hot springs in the area date back to the time of the Romans and can be found in the villages of:

  • Arnedillo: Arnedillo Spa. Pools of hot springs for public use.
  • Cervera del Río Alhama: La Albotea Spa.
  • Gravalos: Balneario de Grávalos.
  • Navajún: the spring of “rotten waters” (Manantial de “aguas podridas”.)

Information / Visitor Centres

There are quite a few municipal information centres in the towns and villages so information is fairly easy to come by in the Valles de Leza – Jubera – Cidacos and Alhama Biosphere Reserve. There are also a few dedicated interpretation centres in the area.

The Paleontology Centre of Enciso

In the town of Enciso and installed in an old shoe factory, this interpretation centre is dedicated to the investigation of the dinosaur remains in La Rioja. See the website here in Spanish http://centropaleontologicodeenciso.org/

The Lost Ravine (Barranco Perdido)

Barranco Perdido is a paleo-adventure park in the town of Enciso where visitors can complement their visit to the important ichnite deposits and the paleontological center of the town.

https://www.barrancoperdido.com/

Contrebia leucade celtiberian city

About 2,5 Km from the village of Aguilar del Río Alhama, the interpretation center for Contrebia leucade, one of the most important celtiberian cities of the Iberia Peninsula dating from the end of the 3rd century BC, is well worth the visit.

http://www.contrebialeucade.com/

The official website for the Valles de Leza – Jubera – Cidacos and Alhama Biosphere Reserve (in Spanish) is here: https://www.larioja.org/medio-ambiente/es/reserva-biosfera


Wildside Holidays – Spain

Take a trip on the Wildside! Discover the wildlife and nature of Spain, its Natural and National Parks and find the top wildlife, activity and walking holiday companies.

Sierra de Irta Natural Park

  • Region: Valencian Community
  • Province: Castellón
  • Declared a Natural Park: 2002 (Also declared a Marine Reserve of fishing interest.)
  • Park surface area: 7743 hectares
  • Towns and villages: Alcalá de Chivert, Peñíscola, Santa Magdalena de Pulpis

Points of interest

The Sierra de Irta Natural Park (in Valencian Parc Natural de la Serra d’Irta) is located in the Baix Maestrat region at the northern end of the province of Castellón. It was declared a Natural Park and Marine Natural Reserve in order to also conserve the maritime strip bordering the coast of the Sierra de Irta and is a fine example of the Valencian coastal marine environment.

This protected area constitutes one of the most beautiful landscapes on the Valencian coast and represents one of the last mountain ranges that remain undeveloped on the Mediterranean coast and along with the Campanilles peak at 572 metres, the cliff of Torre Badum and 12 km of coastline there are numerous cliffs and coves in an area that, historically, was scarcely populated.

Find a hotel close to the Sierra de Irta Natural Park

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Flora

“Maquis” scrubland occupies most of the surface area with the most frequent species being Pistacia (Pistacia lentiscus), juniper (Juniperus oxycedrus), white and broom heather (Erica arborea and E. scoparia), Cistus such as (Cistus monspeliensis, C. salviifolius, C. albidus), and gorse (Calicotome spinosa).

The geranium of Irta , an endemism of the mountains, is also apparently noteworthy (but I have failed to find a scientific name for this plant nor ever seen one! 🙂

Fauna

Marine bird life includes yellow-footed gull (Larus cachinnans), Sandwich tern (Sterna sandvicensis) and Audouin’s gull (Larus audouinii). Bonelli’s eagle, peregrine falcon, Eleonor’s falcon and the Eurasian eagle owl have breeding populations present along with ravens, Eurasian scops owl, tawny owl and the little owl.

The Mediterranean tortoise (Testudo hermanni). is present in the area following a reintroduction project that started in 2005 and over 1000 individuals have been released to date.

Other places to visit

The Sierra de Irta Natural Park is rich in heritage and it is worth highlighting the castles of Alcalá de Chivert and Santa Magdalena de Pulpis which belonged to the Order of the Temple Knights. (Also there is the remains of an Iberian settlement from the 7th century BC next to the castle of Alcalá de Chivert).

There is a network of watchtowers that were designed to protect the area from maritime incursions, the most important of which are the Ebrí tower and the Badum tower.

Information/Visitors Centers

Centro de Interpretación del Parque Natural de la Serra d’Irta y Reserva Natural Marina d’Irta

The Interpretation Center of the Serra d’Irta Natural Park and Marina d’Irta Natural Reserve is located at kilometer 1.5 of the CV-141 (entrance road to the town of Peñíscola from the N-340).

There are two rooms filled with information about the natural, cultural and landscape values ​​of the protected area.

There is also an audiovisual film about the Natural Park and its main places of interest.

The official website for the Parque Natural de la Serra d’Irta y Reserva Natural Marina d’Irta is here: https://parquesnaturales.gva.es/es/web/pn-serra-d-irta/centro-de-visitantes


Iberia Nature Forum

Struggling with identifying those bugs and beasties? Why not check out the Iberia nature Forum!

Discover the Iberia Nature Forum – Environment, geography, nature, landscape, climate, culture, history, rural tourism and travel.

Tetrao urogallus cantabricus – Cantabrian capercaillie – Urogallo cantábrico

  • The western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) is the largest member of the grouse family and the heaviest-known specimen, recorded in captivity, had a weight of 7.2 kilograms (16 pounds). The species is found across Europe and the Palearctic, is primarily-ground-dwelling and is renowned for its elaborate courtship displays. (Males are also nearly twice the size of the females). The global population of Tetrao urogallus is listed as “least concern” under the IUCN.

There are, however, sad signs that some of the sub species are threatened, especially the Spanish Tetrao urogallus cantabricus – Cantabrian capercaillie – Urogallo cantábrico.

There are two sub species in Spain

  • Tetrao urogallus cantabricus (Cantabrian capercaillie) can be found in northwestern Spain
  • Tetrao urogallus aquitanicus can be found in the Pyrenees of Spain (and France)
Tetrao urogallus cantabricus - Cantabrian capercaillie - Urogallo cantábrico
Tetrao urogallus cantabricus – Western capercaillie – Urogallo cantábrico – The males are much larger than the females

Imminent extinction for the Cantabrian capercaillie

Having been declared in danger of extinction in 2018, the latest survey reveals that there are less than 300 individuals left in the Cantabrian mountains and very few of these are reproductive males. This brings the number below the minimum for a viable population for the survival of the subspecies which has already disapeared from Galicia and Cantabria. The remaining bulk of the surviving birds are located in León with a few also still present in Asturias.

The cause for the decline in numbers has various factors such as the impact of human activities, infrastructure, forest fires, illegal hunting, crashes with power lines and habitat fragmentation. Added to this, in breeding, a low birth rate and also a high mortality rate of hatchlings can be pointed out.

However, one must not forget that this species was hunted legally up to the 1980’s and then heavily poached pretty much up to present day. The male, due to his size was coveted by hunters and the results of this indiscriminate hunting are now plain to see.

Tetrao urogallus cantabricus - Western capercaillie - Urogallo cantábrico
Tetrao urogallus cantabricus – Western capercaillie – Urogallo cantábrico – The females are almost half the size of the males

Secrecy and mixed messages surrounds the Asturian captive breeding programme

As early as 2007, a captive breeding programme was set up in the Asturian locality of Sobrecobio but since that date very few Cantabrian capercaile have been released into the wild. Even volunteers from various ecological groups such as SEO/BIRDLIFE have been blocked from entering of finding out what the project entails and the methods being used. In 2020 records published showed that just 13 eggs were produced by the captive individuals with only 4 hatchlings that went on to die within the first weeks of life.

Something is obviously not right when one looks at the Scottish successes of captive breeding and re introduction and most people are pointing the finger at the bad management practices at the centre.

Un undated (maybe 2017?) report on the official website of the The Life + Cantabrian Grouse program publishes that 5 female birds were released into the wild with four dying quite quickly and the 5th losing transmitter signal so its fate is unknown. The overall message of the report is positive and no mention is made of the project failing either now or in the future. You can read the report in English here: https://lifeurogallo.es/en/content/results

The situation in Castilla y León

The news is slightly more positive in Castilla y León where there is a new recovery project being developed to adapt power lines in capercaille habitat and also there are plans for a new captive breeding center for in Valsemana (León). However, although announced at the beginning of 2021 the breeding centre still has not been created so time will tell what the fate of the Cantabrian capercaillie will be here.

The future

Tetrao urogallus cantabricus – Cantabrian capercaillie – Urogallo cantábrico thrives in places where humans do not go and that can be demonstrated by the habitat where the species is more abundant across Europe. They really need the zero presence of humans, cattle and deer; the lack of forest or livestock tracks, other infrastructures and especially power lines.

One of the big debates has been whether or not to introduce males into the Cantabrian Mountains from the Pyrenees where there are more than 3,000 individuals at the last census ( in France the species is abundant and still classified as a hunt species). Of course if males of the other Spanish subspecies Tetrao urogallus aquitanicus are introduced, this will of course be another nail in the coffin for Tetrao urogallus cantabricus.

Strong criticism has also come from many sectors about the money spent in recent years on actions to try to recover the population of the species, especially in the Life + Cantabrian Grouse program where over 6 million euros has been invested. Without doubt full transparency and cooperation with experienced organisations will be needed if this project continues. Right now though, the future looks pretty bleak for the Cantabrian grouse.

There is an official video from the The Life + Cantabrian Grouse program official website but I always find it suspicious when comments are not enabled. I suppose they don’t want any negative comments posted. 🙂


Further reading

Wikipedia has a pretty good information page here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantabrian_capercaillie

The Life + Cantabrian Grouse program oficial website is here: https://lifeurogallo.es/en (mostly Spanish with some English information)

In Spanish, SEO/BirdLife also has an information page: https://seo.org/ave/urogallo-comun/


Feel free to leave any comments or join in with the conversation about the Cantabrian capercaillie over at the Iberia Nature Forum: https://iberianatureforum.com/forums/topic/future-not-good-for-the-cantabrian-capercaillie/

Giant crab spider (Huntsman)

  • English: Giant Crab Spider
  • Spanish: Araña cangrejo gigante
  • Scientific: Eusparassus dufouri
  • Distribution: Iberian Peninsular, Italy and Greece.
  • Size: Males up to up to 8 cm with a body length of up to 2 cm. Females up to 9 cm with a body length up to 3 cm

Description

The giant crab spider, also referred to as a huntsman spider, is quite common and one of the largest to be found on the Iberian Peninsula. It has a base colour of grey to light brown, the colours and patterns vary greatly. In general the thorax has a fine, pale central line and the abdomen has a brown central streak flanked by a darker margin. The underside of the abdomen has two characteristic dark stripes.

The very long legs tend to be held sideways, grouped closely in a crab-like stance. They are the same as the base colour of the body with marked dark rings. They are fast, agile climbers and can jump.

Giant crab spider (Huntsman)

These are terrestrial spiders which do not build webs,. They do, however, build a shelter pocket of strong silk in which they remain during the day.

These pockets are also used for moulting and for reproduction. They are usually attached to a flat surface such as under rocks, in soil cavities and in old walls, with a preference for sunny areas. They leave their shelter at night to hunt.

Eusparassus dufouri web pocket and shed exoskeleton
Eusparassus dufouri web pocket and shed exoskeleton. This one was located in the folds of a curtain.

Similar species

Eusparassus levantinus is also present in the Iberian peninsular and diferentiating the two can be difficult which is why many people on spain wildlife forums and groups identify these spiders simply as Eusparassus Sp (ie “it’s one of the giant crab spiders”)

(Eusparassus walckenaeri or the Eastern huntsman crab spider is not present in iberia and can be found in areas such as Cyprus, Greece and Turkey).

Further reading

There is an excelent study of both species available in PDF format that does include some text in English but is mostly in Spanish.

Data for a better knowledge of the genus Eusparassus in the Iberian Peninsula are presented. Diagnostic and morphological characters for distinguishing the genus are given. The type species, Eusparassus dufouri Simon, 1932, is reported, and the male is illustrated for the first time.

Eusparassus levantinus (male and female) is described from Spain.

Summarized information on taxonomy, phenology, habitat and geographical distribution is presented for both species.
http://sea-entomologia.org/gia/ria_12_99_115.html

The insectarium virtual also has an excellent search system for many species of insect present in Spain. The following link has an excellent image of Eusparassus levantinus
https://www.biodiversidadvirtual.org/insectarium/Eusparassus-levantinus-img427950.html

See more bugs and beasties in Spain here.


Iberia Nature Forum

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Take a trip on the Wildside! Discover the wildlife and nature of Spain, its Natural and National Parks and find the top wildlife, activity and walking holiday companies in Spain.